Third-Party Screen Replacements Disable iPhone 13 Face ID

Third-Party Screen Replacements Disable iPhone 13 Face ID

Apple unveiled the iPhone 13 family earlier this month after surprisingly few leaks. The lack of leaks might be thanks in part to how boring this year’s iPhone refresh is. The devices are a little faster, have a slightly smaller notch, and the cameras might perform a bit better. Also, it turns out a reasonably priced third-party screen replacement will break Face ID. So, maybe that’s a reason to stick with the iPhone 12.

Face ID is the gold standard for face unlock technology. Apple’s IR face scanning system can identify the phone’s owner in a blink, and no one has come close to the same level of security and functionality. Google toyed with face unlock on the 2019 Pixel 4, but subsequent Pixel phones have stuck with fingerprint sensors. Virtually everyone who buys an iPhone 13 will use Face ID. Unless, of course, they have a busted screen fixed by a third-party repair shop.

According to the Phone Repair Guru YouTube channel, Apple has apparently taken its repair hostility to a new level. After conducting some tests with the iPhone 13, the Guru says that replacing the screen causes Face ID to stop working because the sensors are paired with that specific piece of hardware. Replacing components like the microphone, ambient light sensor, and proximity sensor doesn’t hurt anything, but a non-verified screen forces you to use a passcode every time. Guess what the most common iPhone repair is. Yep, broken screens.

Apple will charge $229 to $329 for an iPhone 13 screen replacement that isn’t covered by an AppleCare subscription. You could get the same component installed by a third party for less, but they most likely will not be able to mate the new screen with the existing hardware. Thus, the phone will report a non-genuine screen and deactivate Face ID. The Phone Repair Guru notes that some non-Apple service centers will have the chops to properly configure the screen, but they are in the minority. For most shops, replacing iPhone screens will no longer be an option.

It’s unclear how the screen and Face ID sensor could be so intimately connected that replacing one would disable the system. Usually, when Apple does something to inconvenience third-party repairs, there is at least a rationale it can wave in everyone’s face. As it stands, this move seems to fly in the face of increasing calls for “right to repair” legislation. The Biden administration and the FTC have both signaled support for these rules, which would prevent companies from blocking third-party repairs. Apple has yet to explain what’s going on with the iPhone 13 screen, so there’s an outside chance it’s just a mistake.

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